Struggling to Hire? — Here’s Three Things You Can Do to Help

3 Tips for Hiring

If you’re finding it difficult to hire employees, you’re not alone. Bloomberg reports that many small businesses struggle to find people who currently want to work; 42% say they have jobs they can’t fill. The number of people quitting jobs right now is also higher than average.  


One culprit is likely COVID-19. For reasons related to the pandemic, many people are choosing not to work right now. They don’t want to risk getting sick, they have children at home, or they may be able to get by for now on unemployment insurance.


Some small businesses with positions to fill have turned to gimmicks like signing bonuses and free food, but these recruiting tactics are unlikely to be effective long term. They don’t address the risks, challenges, and needs people have right now. 


Fortunately for employers looking to hire, people choosing not to work isn’t fundamentally different from the problem of people choosing to work somewhere else. In both cases, the would-be employer has to convince prospective hires that working for them is better than the alternatives, and then they have to live up to those promises.


To be sure, those who choose not to work are missing out on many benefits. A job provides a paycheck and opportunities for employees to do meaningful work, contribute to their community, make friends, develop skills, receive training, advance their career, and fund their retirement. If someone isn’t working, they’re missing out on these and other opportunities. Employers may leverage these benefits to appeal to those who have removed themselves from the workforce and convince them that work is worth it.

Safety, Flexibility, and Pay


Before employers can use benefits like friendship and skill-building to lure applicants, they must first address safety, flexibility, and pay; these are foundational in a hierarchy of employment needs.


While vaccinations are proceeding at a favorable rate and all adults are now eligible, COVID-19 remains a severe threat. It will be some time before people getting their shots now develop immunity to the virus, and they may worry about infecting friends and family who are unable or unwilling to get the vaccine. Because of these fears, some people aren’t going to work, period, and there’s nothing employers can do to persuade them. Others, however, may be open to working if they feel confident enough that the job won’t put them or those they care about in danger.


Flexibility is another crucial component for many potential applicants, much more so now that in-person school and childcare have become scarce. Since younger children cannot fend for themselves while parents are at work, something has to give. Employers that provide flexibility—either through the initial scheduling of shifts or the ability to rearrange working hours on the fly—will likely receive more applicants and have a lower turnover rate.


Other potential employees may be willing to work if they feel the pay is worth the risk and sufficient to cover working costs (transportation, childcare, insurance premiums, etc.).


Of course, most businesses don’t relish the idea of paying employees higher-than-usual wages. Still, there’s good reason to believe that increased pay is a good investment, especially for people in traditionally lower-paying jobs. When people are preoccupied with bills, debts, and other forms of scarcity, they tend to be less productive and make more mistakes. But, when scarcity isn’t taxing their mental bandwidth, they can be more effective, make fewer mistakes, and increase business profitability. Pay increases can pay for themselves. 

Career Development Opportunities


It may be that the positions an employer needs to fill don’t come with an exciting career path or teach the kind of skills that employees are likely to put on future resumes. But that’s not set in stone. Both the employer and the employee choose what skills are learned and used in every position.


Imagine, for a moment, a local deli that needs to hire a person to take orders at the register. The job market might consider this job “low skill,” but the owner of this deli doesn’t think of the job that way or advertise it that way.


Now, the owner doesn’t use the gimmick of giving the job a fancier title than what it entails; instead, they set the job up to provide skills training for more advanced positions in customer service or sales. In the first few days, the new hire will learn the menu and the layout of the register. Still, then, in the lulls between rushes, they’ll learn techniques for talking to customers, de-escalating tense situations, upselling, and the like—training that people in customer service and sales would expect to receive. Later, the new hire might even learn some of the ins and outs of starting and running a small business.


This owner knows that high employee turnover is simply the nature of the business and that employees will, sooner or later, take their training and skills to other jobs. And that’s the point. The aim here is to cultivate a reputation in the community as an excellent place for customers to grab a meal and an ideal place for employees to start learning marketable skills they’ll use throughout their careers, increasing the applicant pool’s size and the deli’s profits.

Attractive Job Postings and Hiring Processes


Poorly written job postings can prove a serious obstacle to getting applicants. As Katrina Kibben reminds us, it’s essential that recruiters and hiring managers understand what they’re looking for in a new hire and write job postings that are simple and effective. 


If an employer offers some or all of the benefits discussed above, they should showcase them in their postings with concrete examples and as part of an engaging story. For instance, instead of the deli owner writing, “We teach valuable skills,” they can explain that downtime will be filled with instruction on sales and de-escalation techniques. And instead of saying, “We offer flexibility,” an employer can advertise that employees have of a range of shifts to choose from weekly or will be able to complete their work at any time of day, so long as weekly deadlines are met.


But no training opportunities will mean a thing if a business’s hiring process is a chore for applicants to get through. The more minutes it takes to complete an application, the more applicants will decide it isn’t worth it. The longer a candidate has to wait for an offer, the more likely they’ll turn down that job offer—sometimes, as Adam Karpiak illustrates, even when they don’t have another job lined up.

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